Videos

Project Syndicate's synopsis of the work by Dr Niaz Asadullah with Dr Antonio Savioa and Professor Wahiuddin Mahmud on poverty and state capacity.

This is the first of three videos created by Popcorn Entertainment for a study on how a new child marriage law affects social attitudes towards the practice in Bangladesh. The project is led by Integgra researchers, with funding from DfID's Economic Development and Institutions research programme.

This is the second of three videos created by Popcorn Entertainment for a study on how a new child marriage law affects social attitudes towards the practice in Bangladesh. The project is led by Integgra researchers, with funding from DfID's Economic Development and Institutions research programme.

This is the last of three videos created by Popcorn Entertainment for a study on how a new child marriage law affects social attitudes towards the practice in Bangladesh. The project is led by Integgra researchers, with funding from DfID's Economic Development and Institutions research programme.

Project Syndicate's Synopsis of the work by Dr Niaz Asadullah and Dr Zaki Wahhaj on female child labour in Bangladesh's garments industry. From May 2017.

 

Project Syndicate's synopsis of "A Blueprint for Child Marriage" by Dr Sajeda Amin, Dr Niaz Asadullah, Barrister Sara Hossain and Dr Zaki Wahhaj. From March 2017.

 

Dr Zaki Wahhaj on BBC World Global News with Matthew Amroliwala on a discussion on marriage trends arounds the world, including the practice of early marriage in South Asia. From December 2016.

 

Dr Zaki Wahhaj on an economic approach to the analysis of child marriage practices in the 'Think Kent' lecture series. From March 2016.

Research Papers

EDI Working Paper Series, April 2019
by Amrit Amirapu, Niaz Asadullah and Zaki Wahhaj
 
ECARES Working Paper 2019-10
by Niaz Asadullah and Zaki Wahhaj
 
University of Kent Economics Discussion Paper Series, October 2018
by Amrit Amirapu, Niaz Asadullah and Zaki Wahhaj
 
Economica, Published online 31 August 2018
by Niaz Asadullah and Zaki Wahhaj
 
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, August 2018
by Zaki Wahhaj
 
PLOS ONE, Published online 19 January 2018
by Kazi Mukitul Islam and Niaz Asadullah
 
Journal of Development Studies, Published online 11 January 2018
by Niaz Asadullah, Sajeda Amin and Nazmul Chowdhury
 
Development Policy Review, Published online 22 November 2017
by Niaz Asadullah, Abdul Alim and M. Anowar Hossain
 
IZA Policy Paper #118, October 2016
by Sajeda Amin, Niaz Asadullah, Sara Hossain and Zaki Wahhaj
 

Women's Life Choices and Attitudes Survey

integgra bangladesh womens survey resized

WiLCAS 2014 (Women's Life Choices and Attitudes Survey) is a nationally representative survey of women in Bangladesh between the ages of 20 and 39, designed to investigate how improved access to secondary schooling for women impact upon long-term outcomes related to employment, migration, marriage, childbirth and investment in children.

The survey is being conducted by the University of Kent and the University of Malaya in collaboration with DATA, Bangladesh (Data Analysis and Technical Assistance).

In the first phase of the survey, the enumeration team visited, between May and July 2014, all households included in the rural sample of the 2010 Bangladesh Household Income and Expenditures Survey which included at least one woman aged between 16 and 35 in 2010, and a random 50% of households in the same sample without any women in this age group. In addition, the enumeration team conducted a census of 75 urban primary sampling units (PSU) in Bangladesh, and 20 households were randomly chosen from each to be included in the survey.

For each household included in WiLCAS 2014, the team implemented a short household questionnaire and an individual questionnaire for each female household member between the ages of 20 and 39. The individual questionnaire included modules on education, marriage, childbirth and child-related investments, social networks, subjective well-being, aspirations, and attitudes towards traditional norms.

The first phase of the survey generated a sample of 7,974 households and 6,293 female respondents (for whom individual questionnaire was implemented) located in 478 different primary sampling units.

For the second phase of the survey, a random sample of 1,500 individuals were drawn from the pool of sisters of the first-phase female respondents who were alive, resident elsewhere and aged between 20 and 39 years. The sisters were traced to their current households, and a household questionnaire together with an individual questionnaire implemented for each of them.

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